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JohnHampdenTheYounger

John Hampden MP


John Hampden (21 March 1653 – 12 December 1696), the second son of Richard Hampden, returned to England after residing for about two years in France, and joined himself to Lord William Russell and Algernon Sidney and the party opposed to the arbitrary government of Charles II. With Russell and Sidney he was arrested in 1683 for alleged complicity in the Rye House Plot, but more fortunate than his colleagues his life was spared, although as he was unable to pay the fine of £40,000 which was imposed upon him he remained in prison. Then in 1685, after the failure of Monmouth's rising, Hampden was again brought to trial, and on a charge of high treason was condemned to death. But the sentence was not carried out, and having paid £6000 he was set at liberty. In the Convention Parliament of 1689 he represented Wendover, but in the subsequent parliaments he failed to secure a seat. It was Hampden who in 1689 coined the phrase "Glorious Revolution".[1] He died by his own hand on 12 December 1696. Hampden wrote numerous pamphlets, and Bishop Burnet described him as "one of the learnedest gentlemen I ever knew".

He married Sarah Foley (d. 1687), and had two children:

  • Richard Hampden (aft. 1674 – 27 July 1728), an MP and Privy Counsellor
  • Letitia Hampden, married John Birch

After her death, he married Anne Cornwallis and had two children:

  • John Hampden (c. 1696 – 4 February 1754), an MP
  • Ann Hampden (d. September 1723), married Thomas Kempthorne
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir William Bowyer, Bt

William Tyringham

Member for Buckinghamshire

with Hon. Thomas Wharton 1679–1681

Succeeded by
Hon. Thomas Wharton

Richard Hampden

Preceded by
Richard Hampden

Edward Backwell

Member for Wendover

with Edward Backwell 1681–1683 1681–1685

Succeeded by
Richard Hampden

John Backwell

Preceded by
Richard Hampden

John Backwell

Member for Wendover

with Richard Hampden 1689–1690

Succeeded by
Richard Beke

John Backwell

[edit] ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ In testimony before a House of Lords committee in the fall of 1689; Schwoerer, L.G. (2004), The Revolution of 1688-89: Changing Perspectives, Cambridge U.P., 310 pages ISBN 0521526140, p. 3

[1] This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh ed.). Cambridge University Press.

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